CPNP 2022 industry supported symposia are scientific programs developed for educational purposes. All symposia at CPNP 2022 are designed for the psychiatric pharmacist and are included in participant registration fees. All symposia are in compliance with Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) criteria for planning and implementation and provide 1.5 contact hours of ACPE credit.

Monday, April 25, 7:00 AM (CDT)

Keeping the Body in Mind: Metabolic Effects of Antipsychotic Medications

Faculty

Jonathan Meyer, MD
Clinical Professor of Psychiatry
University of California, San Diego

Psychopharmacology Consultant
California Department of State Hospitals

Learning Objectives

  1. Investigate the hypothesized neurobiological mechanisms by which antipsychotics may alter metabolic parameters
  2. Implement treatment strategies aimed at reducing or avoiding metabolic side effects to improve treatment adherence

Overview

Individuals with schizophrenia have a life expectancy that is, on average, twenty years lower than the general population. One potential explanation is the increased prevalence of metabolic issues, including obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes that is found amongst individuals with schizophrenia. Data suggest that clinicians are not currently managing or recognizing metabolic side effects of antipsychotics adequately, in part due to a lack of confidence and/or knowledge with respect to proper management. In addition, approved treatments are only just recently available and may not be well known or confidently added into standard clinical practice. Continuing education to address these gaps in clinician understanding is vital towards improving the treatment outcomes of patients with antipsychotic-related metabolic side effects. In this program, Dr. Jonathan Meyer will discuss the most current research findings on how to effectively manage adverse metabolic effects associated with antipsychotic use, not only in schizophrenia but also the many other mental health disorders in which antipsychotics are often employed.

Supported by

This activity is supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Intra-Cellular Therapies.

Tuesday, April 26, 7:00 AM (CDT)

Treatment Advancements to Overcome Barriers in the Management of Schizophrenia: Key Considerations for Pharmacists

Faculty

Megan Maroney, PharmD, BCPP
Clinical Associate Professor
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Psychiatric Clinical Pharmacist
Monmouth Medical Center
Piscataway, NJ

 

Learning Objectives

  • Explore the current and emerging data on the disease burden and progression of schizophrenia
  • Discuss current evidence-based guidelines, newly emerging agents, and therapeutic challenges in schizophrenia
  • Highlight the role of the pharmacist in addressing treatment challenges in schizophrenia, including patient education and optimizing adherence

Overview

Clinical consequences associated with uncontrolled symptoms of schizophrenia present treatment challenges and can increase disease burden for both patients and health care providers. Recognizing treatment challenges, including nonadherence to therapy or suboptimal therapy, and identifying potential strategies to improve adherence are essential to prevent disease relapse and improve overall patient outcomes. Pharmacists have an important role in the treatment of schizophrenia by helping to choose initial therapy according to patient-specific factors, addressing suboptimal therapeutic responses, and mitigating adverse effects. The current treatment landscape of schizophrenia continues to evolve with novel therapies and routes of administration, offering pharmacists more opportunities to make treatment interventions to improve patients’ symptom control, improve adherence, and address treatment-related challenges. This program will review updated clinical guidelines, efficacy and safety of newer treatment strategies, and considerations for their administration in both inpatient and outpatient clinical practice settings.

Supported by

This activity is supported by an educational grant from Alkermes.

Tuesday, April 26, 12:00 PM (CDT)

Addressing Persistent Myths and Misconceptions in Tardive Dyskinesia

Faculty

Craig Chepke, MD, FAPA
Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Atrium Health
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, UNC School of Medicine
Medical Director, Excel Psychiatric Associates
Huntersville, North Carolina

Melissa Mitchell, PharmD
Assistant Pharmacy Director, Riverside University Health System
Riverside, California

Patient Advocate

Bethany Yeiser, BS
President, CureSZ Foundation
Fairfield, Ohio

Learning Objectives

After completing this activity, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe why anticholinergics are not recommended for TD treatment
  2. Utilize MOA, key clinical trial data and current guideline recommendations to appropriately implement and/or adjust therapy for TD symptom management
  3. Implement strategies to ensure appropriate novel VMAT-2 dosage for each individual patient

Overview

Tardive dyskinesia (TD), a heterogenous and generally persistent disorder of involuntary hyperkinetic movements of the body and face, is a common potential side effect of treatment with antipsychotic medications. Affecting over 500,000 people in the United States, TD significantly diminishes quality of life, impacting all aspects of patients’ lives and contributing to high rates of nonadherence to antipsychotic therapy and suboptimal outcomes. Although recognition, assessment, and management of TD have improved since the 2017 FDA approval of two novel vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT-2) inhibitors for the treatment of TD, a variety of myths and misconceptions regarding this condition and its optimal management persist. This session will address these common myths and misconceptions in order to improve TD management and positively impact patient outcomes. 

Supported by

Educational grants from Neurocrine Biosciences and Teva Pharmaceuticals
25 Years!